Vacation in San Francisco, October 2010: Powell and Market Streets, Union Square and Driving to Point Reyes Station

I got a later start this day because I packed everything up at the hotel, checked all our bags with the bellman, then checked us out before hitting the streets around 9:00 AM. I walked around the Powell St. station for a bit before heading away from that area. I tried to wander fairly randomly, weaving through the streets joining Powell, Stockton and Grant Streets. I ended up taking my first photos at the China Town gate at Bush and Grant. I wandered a couple of blocks into China Town before heading back down toward Market Street.


Day Five Chinatown GateChinatown gate at Bush and Grant Streets


I wandered up and down Market Street several times, plus I ventured off on a few streets adjoining Market. I experimented with some street photography techniques I had studied the day before to see if I could capture some SF life. I think I did a better job this time around.


Day Five Market Street Smoke Break

Day Five Union Square Sleeping and StudyingSmoke Break on Market Street; Sleeping and Studying in Union Square


After walking a bit, I realized I had not yet had breakfast. Using my Droid’s Places look-up, I quickly researched a nearby cafe called Honey Honey Cafe & Crepery. I stopped there for a latte and their Breakfast Crepe with a side of potatoes. While it wasn’t quite as good as the Butler and Chef from a few days before, it was a very close second and a very lucky find.


Day Five Honey Honey Breakfast CrepeHoney Honey Cafe Breakfast Crepe


After breakfast, I walked up and down Market Street a few more times, trying to capture some more street photos. After I tired of that, I headed over to Yerba Buena Gardens to grab a drink and rest in the shade until Lori’s conference was over.


Day Five Sleeping on the CornerBeggar and his puppy, both sound asleep on the street corner


After catching the shuttle back to the airport, we had our choice of either a bright yellow VW Beetle or a tan Dodge Charger to rent for the rest of the week. Although the bug was tempting, a quick assessment of how much luggage we had led us to choose the Charger with its larger trunk instead. On our way to Point Reyes Station, there was no toll at the Golden Gate Bridge because we were going north bound. We would, however, have to pay that toll on our way back. After the Golden Gate Bridge, our route wound through some very scenic and windy roads until we arrived at our vacation cottage in Point Reyes Station, a town of 350 people.


Day Five Golden Gate Bridge CrossingLori captured this dashboard shot with my camera
while I was busy driving across the Golden Gate Bridge


We were both very hungry and had spied a restaurant on the way in called The Farm House Restaurant & Bar At Point Reyes Seashore Lodge. We hopped in the car and drove back down to the town of Olema (only about 10 minutes away) to have dinner. I had a 23 ounce draft Lagunitas IPA and Lori had a glass of their house Pinot Grigiot. We both had the Pulled Pork BBQ sandwich with delicious yam fries.

We then headed back to the house and relaxed on the back porch the rest of the afternoon while doing some laundry to get us by the rest of the week. The sky was very clear that night, and there was very little light pollution. I could just make out the Milky Way. I also spotted a few satellite flares overhead and saw a few shooting stars.


Day Five Rental Home DeckThe back deck at our rental home in Point Reyes Station


Just Whipped This Up: Home Made Blended Iced Coffee

Just whipped this up this afternoon. I was doing some work around the house and needed a quick pick-me-up. I noticed some coffee left over from earlier this morning and took stock of our milk and sugar supply. Yup, everything I needed was ready to go!

Into my blender I dumped about 16 ounces of room temperature coffee (DO NOT use hot coffee unless you’d enjoy a trip to your local hospital’s burn unit!) and the same amount of 1% low fat milk. Then I dropped in about 2/3 cup sugar. I sealed the lid up tight and blended on low for about 45 seconds to a minute. The milk instantly frothed up and the blender almost overflowed! When I do this again, I’ll have to remember to use less coffee and milk or risk making a mess.

Once blended, I poured this into a pitcher which I placed in the fridge. I then crushed some ice into a cup and poured myself a rich, creamy iced blended coffee drink which rivals the concoction they sell at various shops around town.


Ken’s Iced Blended Coffee Drink

  • 12-16 ounces cold or room temperature coffee
  • 12-16 ounces cold 1% our skim milk (same amount as coffee)
  • 2/3 cups sugar (more or less to taste)

Place ingredients in a large (at least 45 to 50 ounce) blender. Blend on low for about a minute until all the sugar is dissolved and the drink takes on a frothy consistency. Pour into a pitcher and refrigerate. Serve over crushed ice.

Vacation in San Francisco, October 2010: SOMA, Embarcadero, Castro, The Haight, and Sushi

I wandered around quite a bit this day. I started out at South Park at The Butler & Chef Bistro. There I ordered a latte and “La Parisienne,” a hearty buckwheat crepe with ham and cheese. This delicious breakfast filled me up so well, I was not hungry until much later that afternoon.


Day Four Butler and Chef BreakfastMy excellent breakfast at The Butler & Chef


After breakfast, I walked down to AT&T Park, took some photos, then started heading up the Embarcadero from the South Beach area towards the Ferry Building Market. On the way, I stopped at Pier 14 just north of the Bay Bridge to take some more photos. When I got to the Ferry Building, I hung around the area for a bit. At that time of day (around 10:30) they were just setting up the outdoor stands.


Day Four Boats near AT&T Park
Day Four Pier 14 PanoBoats near AT&T Park and a stitched panorama of photos from Pier 14


Next, I hopped on the F line streetcar to Fisherman’s Warf. I took that car to the end of the line before hopping off. I walked around the Warf area for a bit, then hopped back on the streetcar heading back to Market and 5th street. I hung around that area for a little while, then hopped back on the streetcar line and took it all the way to the other end of the line, stopping in Castro.

In Castro, I walked back up Market, turning at Noe St. toward Haight St. At Haight St. I started walking uphill, but decided to grab a bus the rest of the way. I took the bus past Haight-Ashbury toward the Golden Gate Park end and got off there. I took a brief stroll through that end of Golden Gate Park before turning around and heading up Haight St.


Day Four Gargoyles between Castro and HaightGargoyles guarding the entrance to a home on Haight Street


Once through Upper Haight and part way through Lower Haight, I turned at Steiner St. heading back toward Market St. I caught the streetcar again at Market and Church, taking that all the way back to 5th St and Market.

By this time it was late afternoon, my legs were completely exhausted from the past several days of walking, and I had skipped lunch. I decided to stop again at the Thirsty Bear to take notes on my photos, eat and have a few beers. I ordered the bocadillos (house made mini-burgers of lamb, pork and beef; hard-boiled egg, caper aioli. with summer squash escabeche) and the empanadas (braised pork & queso fresco, roasted squash romesco & spiced pepitas). For beer, I tried their Full Belly seasonal followed by the Meyer IPA and finishing with a Koslov Stout. While there, I researched street photography techniques hoping to improve my skills for the next day.

Lori had just finished up her conference for the day, so we met back at the room and made plans for dinner. Since I wasn’t super hungry we decided to go out for sushi. A few days earlier I had noticed a sushi place just north of Union Square while walking down Powell street. I researched it online and found it was very highly rated. We took the cable car from the Powell St. Station up the hill to Sutter St.


Day Four Cable Car at Powell Station

Day Four Maru SushiCable car at Powell Station and Maru Sushi


At Maru Sushi I ordered a large hot sake and the Chirashi bowl (sashimi over rice). Lori had the Yummy Yummy roll and we shared an appetizer of crab jalapeno poppers. We then walked back down Powell St. to our hotel where we again crashed for the night.

Vacation in San Francisco, October 2010: Japantown, Chinatown, Coit Tower and Financial District

This was Lori’s first conference day, so she was not able to join me for the touristy stuff. We did get to have coffee and a pastry from a nearby Starbucks together before parting company around 7:45. I then walked up Powell Street to Geary Street to catch the 38 bus line at that corner. I hopped off at Geary St and Laguna St. I was very early, and most of the shops did not open until 11 so I had to walk around for a bit. Japantown isn’t very big so that did not eat up a lot of time, but I got some good photos of the Japantown Peace Plaza Pagoda.


Day Three Japantown Peace PlazaJapantown Peace Plaza Pagoda


To kill some more time and re-fuel for the day, I stopped at O Izakaya Lounge for a Japanese-style breakfast bento. Grilled salmon, scrambled eggs, miso soup, rice, fruit and vegetables were all present.


Day Three O Izakaya LoungeJapanese breakfast at O Izakaya Lounge


By the time I finished breakfast some more shops had started opening up. Soko Hardware was my first stop. It was a regular American hardware store that also carried a lot of Japanese goods. Most of the Japanese products were downstairs, but there were some traditional Japanese woodworking tools upstairs. This place had the best pricing for iron teapots in the area.

Sanko Cooking Supplies was near Soko Hardware. They also had iron teapots, a very large selection of table service, and small appliances such as rice cookers.

I then walked through the Japan Center Mall which has the Peace Pagoda between its two buildings. Most of the shops were still closed, but there were many people hanging around the restaurants and shops which were open. There were enough open ones to keep me busy until the rest opened at 11:00. Kinokuniya Bookstore reminded me of a Barnes and Noble, but it had about 90+ percent Japanese language publications and books. That made me wish I had at least some Japanese reading ability. I also stopped in a store called Sanrio with a ton of pink Hello Kitty merchandise to snap a few pictures on my phone which I sent to Lori.


Day Three Sanrio Hello Kitty OverloadIs this much Hello Kitty in one place even legal?


The Katachi knives store had all sorts of cool Japanese swords ranging in price from $25 to $2500+. They also had knives, statues and figurines. I resisted the temptation to pick up a sword and have it shipped back home.

Asakichi Cast Iron was a tiny shop on the bridge spanning across Webster St. between mall buildings. Here I purchased a small ceramic koi figurine for Lori. They also had Samurai figurines, boxes, tea pots and other figurines all in cast iron.

I left Japantown on the same 38 bus route back to Powell and Geary Streets. From there, I hopped on one of the Powell cable cars taking it up the hill to California Street. I then walked down California turning at Stockton to head into Chinatown. I wandered around a few blocks in Chinatown for the next 45 minutes or so, then decided to grab some lunch at Mario’s Bohemian Cigar Store Cafe. I headed over to Columbus Ave, then up to Mario’s in the North Beach or little Italy area near Washington Square.

Mario’s was packed around 1 PM, but I managed to grab an outside table with one chair. As Lori had warned me, service was very slow. I had to hang out at my table for quite some time before the waitress acknowledged my presence. Once she did, however, the service was fine. I had the meatball panini sandwich (by Lori’s recommendation) with a Hop Head Red beer from Green Flash Brewing Company.


Day Three Marios Sandwich

Day Three Marios BeerSandwich and Beer at Mario’s Bohemian Cigar Cafe


After lunch, I walked through Washington square, then headed uphill to Coit Tower. Since Lori didn’t have much luck capturing the murals inside the tower, I attempted to do a better job with my point and shoot camera. I also paid the $5 admission to go to the top and took photos from each of the windows before heading back down into Chinatown for an afternoon snack.


Day Three Coit Tower View

Day Three Coit Tower MuralA view from the top of Coit Tower,
and one of the mural panels inside at the bottom of the tower.


I wandered through Chinatown a bit more, taking some photos along the way. I then ended up at the AA Bakery where I purchased an egg custard. That I took with me to the Transamerica Pyramid where I found a quiet seat in their Redwood Park to eat it. After the custard was gone, I took a few photos in the park and of the building, then headed over to California Street to catch the cable car back up the hill.


Day Three Transamerica park

Day Three Transamerica PyramidSculpture in Transamerica Redwood Park and the Transamerica Pyramid


I stood on the front corner of the cable car and shot a short video with my camera as it went up the hill on California Street between Kearny St and Grant Ave“. I got off again at Powell and California, then walked down Powell back toward our hotel. I stopped in at The Chieftain to have a couple of beers while waiting for Lori to finish up her conference for the day.



Video shot from the front of a San Francisco cable car


When Lori contacted me, she had made plans for us to go on a double date with one of her co-workers and her husband. We started off at The View at the top of the Marriott Marquis with drinks and appetizers watching the sun set while we talked. Next, we headed over to The Thirsty Bear for some tappas and beers. Finally, we ended the evening at Mel’s Drive-In on Mission Street for some dessert before heading back to the hotel to rest before another big day.

Vacation in San Francisco, October 2010: Sunday in Golden Gate Park

We got up way too early (still on Iowa time), got ready and headed over to the Lori’s Diner on Powell St. around 7:45. I ordered the Cable Car Pancakes, described as “Two Large Cakes, Two Slices of Bacon, Two Links of Sausage and Two Eggs.” Lori had the Short Stack with sliced bananas. Just the thing to fuel up before a day of riding bikes in the park!


Day Two Loris DinerLori is, naturally, a big fan of “her” Diner


After breakfast, we headed to the Muni kiosk at the Powell cable car turn-around to pick up 3-day passes for $13 each. Just as we activated our passes, our bus, the #5 route, was arriving so we hopped on that. The bus wound past the Civic Center and took us to the North side of Golden Gate Park. We got off the bus at Fulton St. and 6th Ave. but were too early to pick up our rental bicycles from Golden Gate Bike and Skate so we walked along JFK to pass some time and take some photos.


Day Two Golden Gate Park 01Golden Gate Park, Mist in the Trees


Once 10:00 rolled around, we picked up our mountain bikes, helmets and bike lock for a total of $50 for the day. We rode around the park, sticking close to the East end at first. After tiring of that, we decided to venture further and take JFK all the way to Ocean Beach. The beach area was very foggy and the surf was up. Several brave surfers were going out in this, but you couldn’t see them at all as they disappeared beyond the breakers. Very dangerous!


Day Two Crazy SurfersOcean Beach: Crazy or Dedicated Surfers?


After walking the beach for awhile, we headed over to Beach Chalet Brewery & Restaurant. It was packed, so we ate at the bar to avoid waiting for a table. I ordered the Dungeness Crab Louis Salad and Lori had a bowl of their Clam Chowder New England Style. I had a Dee’s Bitter Ale and Lori had a V.F.W. Light.


Day Two Beach Chalet BarView from the Beach Chalet Bar


Fueled up and rested, we then rode uphill back toward the East end of the park. We stopped to take a stroll through the Japanese Tea Garden ($7 admission each), making sure to take plenty of photos to get our money’s worth.


Day Two Japanese Tea GardenJapanese Tea Garden in Golden Gate Park


After that we took a walk through the park between the museums. There was an art fair going on, and The Blue Angels were flying around as part of Fleet Week, so we got to see them flying overhead, too.

By that time it was about 3:30 PM and we were both getting tired. We decided to turn in our rentals and head back to our hotel, again via the #5 bus route.

Back at the hotel we freshened up a bit then headed to the deck on the 6th floor to hang out and play on our laptops a bit. Lori’s laptop ran out of battery too quickly, and it got cold up there so we did not stay very long. Back at the room we got ready for dinner at The Chieftain. I had their Fish and Chips with two Prohibition Speakeasys (a local brew). Lori had a salad with grilled shrimp and a glass of wine.

We headed back to the hotel room and crashed for the evening.


Please check back for more photos I’ll be adding to the set for this trip on my Flickr page.

Removing Extra .vswp Files from VMware vSphere 4.x

Overview

When a virtual machine (VM) is shut down, part of that process is the deletion of its .vswp or virtual machine swap file. If, however, the host on which the VM is running crashes, the .vswp file may not get removed. When the VM powers back up, it will create a new .vswp file and leave the old one in place. If there are several host crashes, this can start to eat up datastore space, robbing your VMs of space for snapshots or causing issues if you’ve over-allocated your storage.

Procedure

First off, a warning. If you delete the active .vswp file I don’t know what will happen, but I’m sure it will be Very Bad Indeed. Therefore, the most important part of this procedure is to identify the newest or youngest .vswp file created. This should be the one with the latest time stamp on it.

Another way to guarantee you identify the correct .vswp file is to shutdown the virtual machine properly. This will remove the active .vswp file, leaving behind only the extra ones you no longer need. To minimize confusion, make sure there are no snapshots of the VM prior to shutting it down.

Once you’ve identified the active .vswp file or shut the VM down to remove it, you can then use the vCenter client to browse your VM’s datastore and remove the extra .vswp file or files.

Using rsync to find the size of changed data between two directories

OK, so I searched Google but couldn’t find the magic combination anywhere. Hopefully, this post will help you!

The setup: I wanted to compare the contents of two directories which had previously been synchronized via rsync without actually synchronizing them. The main goal was to find out the total size of the data which would need to be transferred so I could estimate how long the actual rsync run would take. To do this, you’d think the following would work, based on the rsync man pages:

rsync -avvni sourcedir/ destdir/

Broken down that is:

  • -a archive meta-option
  • -vv extra verbosity
  • -n dry run
  • -i itemize changes

The output, however, lists “total size” as the total size of all the files — NOT just the size of the changed files which would be synchronized. So I did some research using the rsync man page and some testing with several options combinations and came up with the following solution:

rsync -an --stats sourcedir/ destdir/

Here’s a mock sample output from running that command:

Number of files: 2
Number of files transferred: 1
Total file size: 4096 bytes
Total transferred file size: 2048 bytes
Literal data: 0 bytes
Matched data: 0 bytes
File list size: 82
File list generation time: 0.013 seconds
File list transfer time: 0.000 seconds
Total bytes sent: 110
Total bytes received: 32
sent 110 bytes  received 32 bytes  284.00 bytes/sec
total size is 4096  speedup is 1.23

The particular stats you’ll need to parse are the following:

  • Total file size: (given in bytes)
  • Total transferred file size: (also in bytes, this is the changed data to be transfered)

You can ignore Total bytes sent and Total bytes received as they only refer to the actual data transferred by the rsync process. In a dry run (-n option) this amounts to only the communication data exchanged by the rsync processes.

Also of interest are the Number of files and Number of files transferred statistics. It is also worth noting that the trailing slashes on the directories are important. If you leave them out, what you are actually testing is the copying of sourcedir to destdir/sourcedir which is probably not what you want to do if you are trying to compare their contents.

If this post was helpful to you, please spread the word and share it with others!

Vacation in San Francisco, October 2010: Travel Prep and Travel Day

Travel Preparation

Lori and I both took off the day before our flight so we could pack, prepare the house and pets, and get some rest before getting up early. Our flight was scheduled to leave Des Moines around 6:30 AM, and Lori’s father was going to pick us up around 4:30 AM so we could get t the airport early.

I packed a small suitcase with about 4-5 days worth of clothing and my Lowepro camera/laptop backpack. We were to have laundry by mid-week when we got to our rental home in Point Reyes Station, so I was able to pack lighter than usual.

I drove Ruffy to the kennel around 16:00, dropping him off around 16:30-16:45. As usual before a bit travel day, neither of us could get to sleep. I did not get to bed until around 23:45, and Lori was up much, much later trying to decide what to pack.

Travel Woes

We arrived at the airport with plenty of time to spare before our flight, only to be met by a long line. Overhearing a few of the other passengers’ frustrated discussions, I surmised that our flight had been canceled. The line was full of other passengers waiting to get re-booked on another flight, and it only got longer as we waited for our turn at the counter.

Once we got to the ticketing counter, I could tell the poor lady working there was quite flustered after dealing with a few difficult people in the line before us. I tried to be extra patient and friendly with her to make her day a little brighter. She got us booked on a 10:30 AM flight to Denver, and re-booked our connecting flight as well. In all, we would only arrive about one hour later than our original itinerary. This worked out OK because we would still arrive prior to the hotel’s check-in time.

Luckily we brought our laptops and the MiFi. We hung out in the cafe drinking coffee and eating breakfast croissants until our flight to Denver boarded. We had a one hour layover in Denver before boarding then next flight in to SFO — just enough time for a quick restroom break and some leg stretching. Fortunately, our flights were uneventful, and we even got a little bit of light napping done in transit.

Arrival and Photos

We arrived in SFO around 13:00, picked up our bags and took the shuttle in to downtown San Francisco. Our room at the Intercontinental San Francisco was not ready so we checked in, left our luggage with the bellhop, and went for a walk to get some exercise and search for some afternoon snacks.

We walked around the Yerba Buena Gardens for a bit, taking some photos. Lori tried to capture the Blue Angels (they were flying over the city because it was Fleet Week) in this one, but they were just too fast.

Day One Me on the Yerba Buena Bridge

I also caught Lori under the archway of the bridge over Howard street by Moscone Center.

Day One Lori on the Yerba Buena BridgeWe ended up at The Thirsty Bear for some tapas and a couple of beers. Lori had her usual, the Polar Bear Pilsner. I tried their seasonal Oktoberfest followed by a Meyer ESB. We ordered the tortilla española of the day (sun-dried tomato), gambas al ajillo (prawns, garlic, pinot gris) and empanadas (braised pork & queso fresco, roasted squash romesco & spiced pepitas). All of the dishes were excellent. Lori liked the gambas al ajillo the best, while I preferred the empanadas.

As is now our travel tradition, we snapped a photo of each other enjoying our first beverages.

Day One Me at The Thirsty BearDay One Lori at The Thirsty Bear

Our appetites satisfied and enough time passed to have a room ready, we headed back to the hotel to rest and plan our next activity. This was the view from our room.

Day One The View from Our Room

After considering several different dinner spots, we decided to try out Sanraku Japanese Restaurant at Metreon for some sushi. Lori had Teriyaki Salmon with a glass of white wine. I had a combo meal with 5 pieces of sashimi and the Teriyaki Beef with a cup (180 ml) of Ozeki sake. Although their Website isn’t much to brag about, the food and service were excellent. Here are a couple of photos Lori took at Sanraku. She got a kick out of the “One Cup” sake.

Day One Sushi at Sanraku

Day One Sake at Sanraku

After dinner, we returned to the room and crashed for the evening. Since we were still on Iowa time, it was technically after midnight for us even though it was only after 10 in San Francisco.